LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Team Edwards on 9/21/2017

Everybody who sells their house won't tell you that they once owned one or more pets,indoor animals that spent hours climbing across furniture, sleeping on the floor and shedding hair. Move into one of these houses and you might start sneezing or coughing less than four hours after you move in.

Protect yourself from annoying pet allergies

If you don't spot pet hairs, you might visit the doctor, thinking that you are coming down with a virus or another illness. That's a reasonable reaction, especially considering how thoroughly some previous homeowners clean their houses before they sell them.

Yet, just because a house looks clean doesn't mean that it really is. Pet allergies are just one reason why you should clean a house before you unpack. Treat the house as if pets once lived at the property. This will ensure a top to bottom cleaning.

In addition to giving the house a general cleaning, you can do is to check the house for signs that pets once lived at the residence. Places to check for signs that pets once lived where you're just moving in are:

  • Air vents
  • Filters, including washer and dryer filters
  • Floorboards
  • Ceiling edges
  • Carpets and other flooring
  • Drains

Move into a house that already has appliances in it and you'll need to check those appliances for pet dander too. The same goes for furniture. Put the attic and basement on your cleaning list as well. Wash the garage if it's attached to the house.

Cleaning your house to reduce pet allergies

After you give the house a first cleaning, wait a day. Then, return and clean the house again. Check rags, sponges and water buckets to see if the second cleaning picked up far less pet dander. It should.

Treat flooring, especially carpet, with shampoo that rids carpet fibers of pet hairs.Also, pay attention to how you react to being in the house for several days. Even if it takes you two weeks to clean and treat the house for pet dander, it's worth it.

You  may live at the house for several years. These early cleanings may seem like a lot of work now, but, when you compare them against how much time you could spend living at the house, this cleaning time is a drop in a bucket.

Take the time to clean and treat whether you have pet allergies or your children, spouse or friends do. Pet allergies don't take much dander to trigger. It takes less than a few hours for allergies to gain strength, causing you to sneeze, cough,develop swollen glands and start to water at the eyes. Stay around pet dander long enough and you might develop a rash and start to feel fatigued.

As inconvenient as it is, checking a new house for pet hair pays off. The sooner you learn that the house you just bought was the former home of a pet, the more time you get to treat the house, reducing the chances that you'll trigger a nasty pet allergy.




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Posted by Team Edwards on 3/30/2017

If you're a dog owner you know well that caring for a dog is like caring for a small child who stays a small child for their entire life. They're a lot of work, but dogs are a part of the family and anyone lucky enough to have a canine companion will tell you that they're more than worth the trouble. One difficulty many dog owners face is burn spots on their lawns. Most people assume that dogs are going to kill their grass one way or another and it's useless to try to prevent it. However, with some diligence and training you can prevent dead spots from taking over your lawn.

What is lawn burn?

Dog urine is very high in nitrogen. While a little bit of nitrogen is healthy for your soil and your grass, too much makes the soil extremely acidic which kills your lawn causing "burn" spots. If you've ever gardened before you might be familiar with the concept of soil's pH number. A pH number describes how acidic (0-6) or how basic (7-14) a substance is. Different types of plant life require different levels of acidity on the pH scale. When you buy fertilizer or plant food at the garden shop you're really buying a mixture of chemicals that alter your soil's pH. The ideal pH for growing healthy grass is 6.5-7, roughly midway on the pH scale.

What can be done?

Ok, so now you know the science behind why your dog doing his business kills your lawn. But what can you do about it? There are a number of different techniques that have been proven to be effective at mitigating or eliminating the damage caused by lawn burn.
  • Training. The most effective methods of preventing lawn burn is through proper training of your dog. Find a part of your yard that you ideally want to train your dog to do their business in. This part can be dirt, rocks, or an out of sight patch of lawn that you don't mind taking some damage. Lead them over to this area when it's time for them to go out and give them treats and verbal praise when they do their business in that area. If they start to urinate in another area, correct them by calling them over to the area they should be in. Don't punish them, as this will confuse dogs and they might not feel safe urinating outside at all.
  • Water down. An effective method of preventing burn spots is to simply saturate the area where the dog urinated with water immediately afterward. This will dilute the nitrogen from the urine and limit damage.
  • Healthy nutrition. Dog food is sometimes very high in protein which increases nitrogen in their urine. Pick a food that has healthy amounts of protein in it. Similarly, dehydrated dogs will have urine with a higher nitrogen level. Encourage your dog to drink plenty of water.

Myths about lawn burn

Many myths about dog-related lawn burn have appeared over the years. Some people argue that female dogs' urine burns a lawn more than males. This is untrue. If a female dog's urine does burn the lawn more it is simply because female dogs have a tendency to stay in one place while doing their business. Other myths include the usefulness of feeding your dog supplements to eliminate spots or that certain dog breeds have more acidic urine and cause more spotting. These are also misconceptions. The best options are to work together with your dog and make sure they are well-fed and hydrated. Soon your lawn will regrow to its former glory.




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Posted by Team Edwards on 10/13/2016

If you're anything like me, your household pet is like a member of the family. Most of us have a soft spot for our pets. When they're hurt we feel their pain. When they're sick we get worried sick about what might be wrong. A difficult part of owning a pet is that since we can't verbally communicate (aside from some commands and accolades) we aren't able to always read how they're feeling. Fortunately, much work has been done when it comes to understanding the nonverbal languages that our animal companions speak. Reading body language and understand your dog's bark and cat's meow can help you be a better pet owner and a better companion to your dog or cat. In this article, we'll let you in on some little known facts about what the body language of your pet means.

Do you speak dog?

Our canine companions tend to let us know how they're feeling. When they're scared they lower their tail and cower. When they're happy they attach us while licks. However, there are many misconceptions about the body language of dogs. Here are some important ones every dog owner should know:
  • Yawning. As humans, we yawn when we're tired. Dogs also share this trait. But if you own one you've probably noticed them yawning much more frequently than we do. This is because they also yawn when they're unsure of a situation, if they're around someone new, and if they're trying to diffuse tension.
  • Whale eye. This is phenomenon occurs when your dog tilts her head and stares out of the corner of her eye, exposing the whites of her eyes. This can be mistaken for a "cute puppy" look, but it normally means they are afraid.
  • Face-licking. As humans we tend to see face-licking as a sign of affection. In dogs, however, it is more likely a friendly sign of appeasement. It is usually seen in puppies and if it carries on into adulthood it can be problematic if your dog frequently licks other dogs' faces who might not appreciate the gesture.
  • Tail position. Horizontal can mean the dog is alert. Facing upwards can mean dominance and aggression. Tail down can mean the dog isn't feeling well or is sad. Tail tucked can mean fear and aggression.

What's your cat thinking?

Cats tend to be a bit more subtle in their communication than dogs (with the exception of when they're hungry and meowing incessantly). However, if you pay attention you can still get a glimpse into how your cat is feeling. There are three main indicators you should notice when trying to read your cat: the tail, eyes, and ears.
  • Tail. A cat's tail will tell you a lot about their mood. A tail standing up and wagging means a cat is happy. However, a straight up, rigid tail can mean a cat who is aggressive. Similarly, a cat who is thumping their tail or waiving it with force can also be trying to show dominance and aggression.
  • Eyes. Cat's eyes are very intense and expressive. Dilated pupils and a focused look can mean the cat is surprised or scared, but can also mean it is hunting something. Relaxed pupils, blinking eyes, or closed eyes, however all mean that the cat feels comfortable and not threatened.
  • Ears. Ears pointing up are somewhat ambiguous; it can mean playfulness or attentiveness. Ears pointing back, however, are a sign of fear and aggression.




Tags: Pets   home   dogs   cats   animals   dog   pet   cat  
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Posted by Team Edwards on 9/15/2016

So, are you relaxed and laid back? Or do you prefer to be on the go and outside? These are two very important questions to ask yourself when considering adopting a pet such as a dog or a cat. Do you have time before and after work to walk the dog? Will you be heading to the park daily, going for a jog, or meeting the kids at school? Can you make time before bed to take a walk with your four legged friend? A dog will fit this lifestyle and enjoy being with you or any member of your household. If you work long days or have job that keeps you traveling, you may want to consider hiring a dog walker so that your dog is not cooped up for too long. A bored dog can be a very mischievous dog and get into things you wouldn't even think about. Are you more of an introvert, homebody, and loner? A cat may be the pet for you. Cats need you when they need you - that's it! For the most part cats are loners, independent survivors. All a cat needs is food, water, liter box, and a window in the sun for bird watching and napping. A cat does not need to be walked or exercised as drastically as a dog. Although it is suggested that you get a few toys and a scratch pad to entertain your kitty cat. Whichever decision you make, you will be welcomed home by either pet every time you enter your home. They will make your long day at work or school so worth it.




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